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Situate yourself at a table with a bright overhead light or gooseneck desk lamp. Set your camera so that it is in sensor cleaning mode with the sensor exposed. (Some cameras require that they be plugged into AC power for this). Using either a hand blower bulb or a CO2 blower gently blow away any lose visible dust. If you have a jewler's eye loup this can be helpful in seeing what you're doing. Don't over do it with blowing, and don't let anything touch the sensor. Never blow into the camera with your mouth.
Next, remove a swab from its sealed pouch and place a couple of drops of Eclipse fluid on the pad. Starting at one side of the sensor glass gently but firmly wipe across the glass from one side to the other. Only lift the pad once you reach the far side. If you have a full-frame sensor camera and the pad isn't wide enough to cover in one pass, turn it over, wet it again with a couple of drops of Eclipse, and do a pass over the other half of the sensor, overlapping the first part slightly.
Use the blower to clean off any stray particles that may have floated in during cleaning, and close the shutter.
Testing
The only way to tell if your cleaning efforts have been effective is to take a test shot. Place a lens on the camera, turn off autofocus, and set the aperture to f/11 or f/16. Take a shot of a white card (the back of a print will do) with the exposure set to 2 stops over the camera's reading.
Plug the card into your computer and load the file into Photoshop. Working in JPG mode makes this a faster process than working in RAW mode. Go to 100% magnification (actual pixels) and examine the image. You will likely see a scary amount of dust. Don't be discouraged. The chances are that you'll rarely see these in real-world images. Only be concerned about the really big stuff. If that's still there, try the process over again.
Try not to get too neurotic about this. My suggestion is that that you only clean the sensor when it gets really dirty. Cloning away minor dust blobs when they are visible only takes a few seconds in Photoshop. If your sensor gets really nasty consider sending it to the manufactruer's repair center for professional cleaning. Don't scrub!
Situate yourself at a table with a bright overhead light or gooseneck desk lamp. Set your camera so that it is in sensor cleaning mode with the sensor exposed. (Some cameras require that they be plugged into AC power for this). Using either a hand blower bulb or a CO2 blower gently blow away any lose visible dust. If you have a jewler's eye loup this can be helpful in seeing what you're doing. Don't over do it with blowing, and don't let anything touch the sensor. Never blow into the camera with your mouth.
Next, remove a swab from its sealed pouch and place a couple of drops of Eclipse fluid on the pad. Starting at one side of the sensor glass gently but firmly wipe across the glass from one side to the other. Only lift the pad once you reach the far side. If you have a full-frame sensor camera and the pad isn't wide enough to cover in one pass, turn it over, wet it again with a couple of drops of Eclipse, and do a pass over the other half of the sensor, overlapping the first part slightly.
Use the blower to clean off any stray particles that may have floated in during cleaning, and close the shutter.


TestingThe only way to tell if your cleaning efforts have been effective is to take a test shot. Place a lens on the camera, turn off autofocus, and set the aperture to f/11 or f/16. Take a shot of a white card (the back of a print will do) with the exposure set to 2 stops over the camera's reading.
Plug the card into your computer and load the file into Photoshop. Working in JPG mode makes this a faster process than working in RAW mode. Go to 100% magnification (actual pixels) and examine the image. You will likely see a scary amount of dust. Don't be discouraged. The chances are that you'll rarely see these in real-world images. Only be concerned about the really big stuff. If that's still there, try the process over again.
Try not to get too neurotic about this. My suggestion is that that you only clean the sensor when it gets really dirty. Cloning away minor dust blobs when they are visible only takes a few seconds in Photoshop. If your sensor gets really nasty consider sending it to the manufactruer's repair center for professional cleaning. Don't scrub!